DP

Fever symptoms

By hoppergbenga • 3 months ago • 427 views • 74 comments

Symptoms

You have a fever when your temperature rises above its normal range. What's normal for you may be a little higher or lower than the average normal temperature of 98.6 F (37 C).


Depending on what's causing your fever, additional fever signs and symptoms may include:


Sweating

Chills and shivering

Headache

Muscle aches

Loss of appetite

Irritability

Dehydration

General weakness

Children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years might experience febrile seizures. About a third of the children who have one febrile seizure will have another one, most commonly within the next 12 months.


Taking a temperature

To take a temperature, you can choose from several types of thermometers, including oral, rectal, ear (tympanic) and forehead (temporal artery) thermometers.


Oral and rectal thermometers generally provide the most accurate measurement of core body temperature. Ear or forehead thermometers, although convenient, provide less accurate temperature measurements.


In infants, doctors generally recommend taking a temperature with a rectal thermometer.


When reporting a temperature to your or your child's doctor, give the reading and explain how the temperature was taken.


When to see a doctor

Fevers by themselves may not be a cause for alarm — or a reason to call a doctor. Yet there are some circumstances when you should seek medical advice for your baby, your child or yourself.


Infants

An unexplained fever is greater cause for concern in infants and in children than in adults. Call your baby's doctor if your child is:


Younger than age 3 months and has a rectal temperature of 100.4 F (38 C) or higher.

Between ages 3 and 6 months and has a rectal temperature up to 102 F (38.9 C) and seems unusually irritable, lethargic or uncomfortable or has a temperature higher than 102 F (38.9 C).

Between ages 6 and 24 months and has a rectal temperature higher than 102 F (38.9 C) that lasts longer than one day but shows no other symptoms. If your child also has other signs and symptoms, such as a cold, cough or diarrhea, you might call your child's doctor sooner based on severity.

Children

There's probably no cause for alarm if your child has a fever but is responsive — making eye contact with you and responding to your facial expressions and to your voice — and is drinking fluids and playing.


Call your child's doctor if your child:


Is listless or irritable, vomits repeatedly, has a severe headache or stomachache, or has any other symptoms causing significant discomfort.

Has a fever after being left in a hot car. Seek medical care immediately.

Has a fever that lasts longer than three days.

Appears listless and has poor eye contact with you.

   Related Post viewed by other

74 Replies | Last update 3 months ago | Last comment

Requires Login